Ahhh, Monhegan!

by | Jun 13, 2020

Twelve nautical miles off the Maine coast and a step back in time, Monhegan Island is a tranquil gem that you don’t want to miss!

NOW is a great time to visit Monhegan Island, to explore the cliffs, or just relax by the water while eating a lobster roll at The Fish House. I also recommend the Fabulous Fish Sandwich at the Fish House: pan fried haddock on a home made ciabatta roll! Yum! You can sit by the beach and enjoy the view of Manana Island and its summer residents . .  the goats. The goat herd winters in Kennebunkport and are returned to Manana in the Spring. Not a bad life!

Fewer crowds give you the authentic feel of quintessential Maine while you are supporting the local businesses & artists. You leave Boothbay Harbor on The Balmy Days at 9:30 a.m. where you will arrive on the island at 11, giving you plenty of time to wander around and enjoy the unblemished beauty of this charming Maine island.

Monhegan Lighthouse sits atop a hill. The road can be a little steep getting there, but there are many spots to stop to enjoy the vistas, schoolhouse, and a cute little art gallery along your way! Don’t forget to stop in the Monhegan Museum that is located in the keeper’s house and maintained by  Monhegan Historical and Cultural Museum Association. The beathtaking view from the top is well worth the walk.

The island is less than one square mile area with unpaved walking trails and no cars. According to the 2010 census, Monhegan has a population of 69. Browse the shops & galleries, have lunch by the water, and take the narrow trail to the D.T. Sheridan Shipwreck just beyond the Monhegan Brewing Company at the end of Lobster Cover Road. There are also trails that wind through the fairy houses in the woods or skirt the cliffs for the more hardy hikers!

The boat leaves the island at 2:45 p.m. but if you’ve never been before you can take a bonus ride circling the island to view the backside before it departs for Boothbay Harbor.  Balmy Days Cruises  start their Monhegan day trips again on June 24th,  $42 for adults and $21 for children 12 and under. Monhegan trips can be booked online at balmydayscruises.com   You can enjoy lighthouses, seals, seabirds, and sometimes you can even spot a whale on the hour and a half boat ride. You’ll arrive back in the Harbor at 4:15 leaving just enough time to get back to Ocean Point for a glass of wine and sunset dinner to finish off a picture perfect day!

 A trip to Monhegan Island is always a favorite on my to-do list and you can add it to your favorites, too!

More Posts

David A. Dudley 4/7/47 – 7/30/20

David A. Dudley 4/7/47 – 7/30/20

The Ocean Point Inn family shares our heartfelt sympathy as we still struggle to absorb the sudden loss of David A. Dudley. David is dearly missed by his fellow Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity brothers as well as his Ocean Point Inn family & friends. So many have...

Chef Michael Whitney

Chef Michael Whitney

It warms my heart to write this Blog post! As we all look forward to Opening Day and to another great season at Ocean Point Inn, we have some news that will surely put a smile on your face. You may have seen him walking around the lounge or dining room, checking in...

Don’t You LOVE A Good Maine Diner?

Don’t You LOVE A Good Maine Diner?

Food trucks, restaurants & cafés. Diners, drive-ins & dives, oh my!  Maine has its share of them all, but the local diners are a favorite of mine! From Southern Maine all the way up the coast and inland as well, old school diners are gathering places for...

Lights, Lights & More Lights!

Lights, Lights & More Lights!

Boothbay shines as a favorite summer vacation destination, but is alive and all aglow in December, too! Four years ago, in December 2015, I attended Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens inaugural “Gardens Aglow” light display with 150,000 lights shining brightly. We took a...

Blushing Blueberry Barrens

Blushing Blueberry Barrens

Cherryfield, Maine is the self-proclaimed “Blueberry Capital of the World!” Located in Washington County, Cherryfield wasn’t always known for wild blueberries, though. It was named for the cherries that once grew along the river banks. The smaller blueberry barrens...